A day in the life of a find processing archaeologist

The working day starts after a quick breakfast at 6:45 am. At first, we must put the finds from the previous day into the database and sort it into boxes in the depot or give it to the person who washes the pottery. One person starts drawing the diagnostic sherds and the ceramic special finds,Continue reading “A day in the life of a find processing archaeologist”

A very ‘small’ update

During this year’s campaign, we finally finished the work on a grave chamber in Doliche which we had the opportunity to excavate in 2017. The chamber was robbed already in late antiquity and most of the grave goods were taken away. But since that time, no one entered this particular grave. Many little objects whichContinue reading “A very ‘small’ update”

What a guitar, water ice, and a headband have to do with an excavation…

We are now in the fifth week here on the excavation, and meanwhile the team has settled in the excavation house and everyone has found their own rhythm. The things that sweeten life in midsummer in south-eastern Turkey are necessary for a smooth everyday life, and so it is helpful that we are allowed toContinue reading “What a guitar, water ice, and a headband have to do with an excavation…”

An Interview with our Workers

During this year’s campaign, we conducted a short interview with the workers we work with every day. The people we interviewed are from different age groups, so we hoped to see different perspectives this way. We wanted to see how they perceived their work areas, whether they were related to the cultural heritage of theirContinue reading “An Interview with our Workers”

A Sunday in Cilicia

It’s Sunday! And on this Sunday we are going on a trip to Cilicia. It will take about 2 hours to get there from Gaziantep, so we leave at 9am. Most of our excavation team is on board for this trip, so we are driving with 3 cars. The road takes us to the west.Continue reading “A Sunday in Cilicia”

First time in Doliche and on an excavation

This year was my first time in Gaziantep/Doliche and the excavation was a harder challenge for me than I anticipated. I left Germany during 17 degrees weather and found myself around 40 Celsius degrees in Gaziantep. Even after four weeks of my stay in Turkey, I couldn’t get used to this heat. So, the challengeContinue reading “First time in Doliche and on an excavation”

Following the footprints of Palaeolithic pioneers at Dülük

Dülük is one of the most important open air Palaeolithic sites in Turkey. Muine Atasayan discovered it in 1938. She visited Dülük village and Roman tombs near it in 14th February 1938 with students from archaeology and anthropology departments from Ankara University. At that day, she discovered the first Palaeolithic tools in the area. ThereContinue reading “Following the footprints of Palaeolithic pioneers at Dülük”

Jupiter Dolichenus and the Dülük Baba Tepesi Part 2/2

Images of a Storm God In our second blog entry about Jupiter Dolichenus we will focus on the depictions of himself and other deities connected to the storm god. We hope to give you a nice picture of the deity that was, for a very long time, so important to the inhabitants of ancient DolicheContinue reading “Jupiter Dolichenus and the Dülük Baba Tepesi Part 2/2”

Jupiter Dolichenus and the Dülük Baba Tepesi Part 1/2

The Architecture on the Mountain As we are still quite some months away from any excavation work in Doliche, we decided to give you some insights into the results of our previous excavation project on the nearby mountain of Dülük Baba Tepesi. The Project ran from 2001 to 2015 and produced a large amount ofContinue reading “Jupiter Dolichenus and the Dülük Baba Tepesi Part 1/2”

How Marbelous!

The Wall Decoration of the Ancient Terrace Basilica In Doliche, a soft limestone was the used for almost every building from the Hellenistic period to the Middle Ages. It was abundantly available and could be carved with great ease. Many quarries can be identified at close distance to the city and even within the urbanContinue reading “How Marbelous!”